Interview

Eva Lemaire: Voices of Migrant Minors: Navigating Immigration to France via Education, Social Welfare, and Immigration

Born in Boulogne-sur-Mer, in the North of France, I can catch a glimpse of the English Coast from my childhood-bedroom window, weather permitting. How many migrants have also cast their gaze in the same direction, upon the cliffs of Folkstone or Dover (England), an “El Dorado” seemingly within easy reach?

Currently, due to international politics, Syrian refugees are converging in the North of France, in Boulogne and even more so in Calais, which has long been a fulcrum point for migrant populations...

Posted by Eva Lemaire on

Jerome Melancon: Hospitality after the Paris Attacks: A #porteouverte for Canada

With shooters and suicide bombers in their midst, Parisians living in the 10th and 11th arrondissements opened their doors to anyone experiencing the same threat. On Twitter, they used the hashtag #porteouverte (#opendoor) to indicate they were willing to be reached by direct message to share their address and welcome strangers in their homes. They expressed and acted upon their solidarity by overcoming the fear that usually divides neighbours and leads to locked doors and closed borders.

At the same moment, as Canadians were learning about the attacks, calls for the government to repeal its plan to welcome Syrian refugees appeared on social media...

Posted by Jerome Melancon on

Srdja Pavlovic: Refugees Ante Portas: Reflections on Strategies of Accommodation in the Age of Disposable Life

The ongoing refugee crisis has significant impact on the framework the European Union applies in order to coordinate and develop border management for member states as well as on the migration processes within the EU itself. Established as the EU agency in 2004 and tasked with helping border authorities from different EU countries work together, FRONTEX is seeing its fundamental premises tested and questioned on a daily basis.

In truth, it is nothing new to argue that the idea about the uninterrupted movement of people within the EU has been plagued by contradictions from the early days of the European Union...

Posted by Srdja Pavlovic on

Anna Kirova: Role of school in smoother transition and acculturation of refugee families with young children

Over the past few months I have been “glued” to any screen showing the thousands of refugees on the roads of Europe–some walking, some being pushed on wheelchairs, and many children being carried on their fathers' shoulders or in their mothers’ arms—and many crowded around fences, trying to push themselves through, to pass a child over the fence, or to try to convince the police officers that they must be let through. These images brought me back to 1989-90 when, along with thousands of other Bulgarians, we were allowed to “enter” the Western world after living behind the Iron Curtain since the Second World War...

Posted by Anna Kirova on

David Wineroither: More refugees, more Europe!

History tends to repeat itself, and this is certainly the case all over this planet when it comes to migration. I come from Austria, a small republic in the Alps and the old heartland of Central Europe. My home town is known for being the city with the highest proportion of foreigners, many of them Turkish and from the Western Balkans. I grew up with this piece of knowledge.

It was much later that I learned of another and much larger wave of immigration of foreigners that had taken place just a few decades earlier...

Posted by David Wineroither on